Commencement 2018 remarks by Kevin Carroll, Chair of the KU Alumni Association

Posted on May 15, 2018 in Alumni News and News

Kevin Carroll commencement remarks 2018

Kevin Carroll, Chair of the KU Alumni Association, welcomed the class of 2018 to the Alumni Association at Commencement. His remarks were as follows:

I am Kevin Carroll and I am honored to serve as the volunteer Chairman of the Board of the KU Alumni Association. Welcome to the ranks of more than 250,000 proud graduates around the world!

KU is a special place with beauty all around—not just the beauty we see with our eyes, but the beauty we feel in our hearts. As you earned your degree, you have been influenced by countless other Jayhawks who share your passion for KU. Some have been professors or coaches or even roommates you would never have met had you not come to KU.

Many of you have selected mentors to guide you through your student years and beyond—but maybe, others sought you out and asked to mentor you. They saw in you something you did not even see in yourself, and they wanted you to succeed in ways you never imagined. As you leave KU, be one of those people, be a mentor to others. Share the Jayhawk spirit and help others as you have been helped. Share your knowledge and compassion with others. Be a Jayhawk!

Another way to show your school pride is to stay connected.  And, the best way to stay connected with all things KU is through membership to the Alumni Association.  Thanks to the Alumni Association and KU Endowment, I am happy to announce that all members of the Class of 2018 will receive one-year graduation gift memberships in the Alumni Association.

Your membership begins today, and you can download the KU Alumni App to learn about all of your benefits. And, after today’s ceremony, we invite you to stop by the Adams Alumni Center to toast your graduation at our Commencement Open House.

Please make the most of your membership by attending alumni events and watch parties with other successful Jayhawks wherever you are, all around the world.  You also can remain in touch with campus news and fellow Jayhawks through our digital communications, and you can learn more about our Jayhawk Career Network, which will benefit you throughout your life through KU Alumni Mentoring and many other connections. No matter where your journey takes you, you will find Jayhawks to help you feel at home—and we hope you’ll return often to this beautiful campus, your home on the Hill.

Rock Chalk and Congratulations, Class of 2018. Welcome to the KU Alumni Association.

For more about Commencement, read our feature on The Walk, or learn more about the medical researcher who received an honorary degree.

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The Walk: A History of Celebration

Posted on May 12, 2018 in Alumni News and News

Ask KU alumni about their favorite KU traditions, and inevitably the walk down the Hill at Commencement will rank near the top. Chancellor Robert E. Hemenway famously remarked in nearly every one of his Commencement addresses that “the walk is the ceremony,” and all who have witnessed this unique spectacle agree that the winding procession down Mount Oread is not only beautiful to behold, it has become a cherished rite of passage for Jayhawks culminating their KU careers.

Fondly remembered by alumni, the walk down the Hill has been celebrated at KU with great pomp and pageantry for nearly a century, making it difficult to imagine a KU Commencement ceremony before this famous tradition.

At his final Commencement in 2009, former Chancellor Hemenway summarized the experience best. “Today, you have joined graduates in the University’s most time-honored ritual, one that binds Jayhawks together, that attaches them as friends with an emotional glue that never breaks. As we say every year, the walk is the ceremony. You have to walk before you can fly. The walk prepares Jayhawks for flight.”

2003: Chancellor Hemenway at Commencement

Founded with grand fanfare and lofty expectations in 1865, the University of Kansas was little more than a preparatory school offering a few college classes in its early days. As a result, it took more than four years for its first graduates to earn their degrees.

On June 11, 1873, KU conferred its first degrees at a formal ceremony inside the brand new and barely finished University Hall. The building, the most modern and finest of its kind on any college campus, would later be known for the chancellor who championed its construction and presided over that first Commencement ceremony, John Fraser.

University Hall

Although KU’s first graduates did not walk down the Hill, KU’s commencement has always featured a procession. At KU’s first Commencement in 1873, the walk was atop the Hill, starting just south of what is now Spooner Hall toward University Hall, positioned just west of present-day Fraser. Around 1897, the graduates adopted the practice of donning academic regalia, including caps and gowns.

When Robinson Gymnasium was completed in 1907, with a larger space for convening a growing class of graduates, the procession moved with graduates gathering at Fraser Hall and continuing west to Robinson, where Wescoe is currently located.

1913: Commencement at Robinson gymnasium

By 1921, plans were being made to construct a memorial stadium on the site of McCook field, and in 1923, organizers decided to try an outdoor ceremony. A giant tent was erected near the new stadium, however the ceremony proved so hot that the tent-covered Commencement would never be repeated.

1923: The infamous commencement tent

In 1924, Commencement exercises were held for the first time at Memorial Stadium located at the foot of the Hill. Graduates walked from Strong Hall down Mount Oread into the stadium, and the tradition continues to this day.

1950s: Commencement as the Campanile is under construction

In the 1950s, KU graduates added to the tradition by walking through the new World War II Memorial Campanile. With the tower nearing completion–yet still clad with scaffolding–enthusiastic seniors found it too difficult to resist and became the first graduates to walk through the Campanile. The symbolic act of walking through Campanile has signaled the transformation from KU student to graduate ever since.

To learn more about Commencement, including the history of class banners, honorary degrees, and the special experience for Big and Baby Jays, read our full feature, The Walk.

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The Walk: Big Shoes Filled

Posted on May 12, 2018 in Alumni News and News

For the students who play Big Jay and Baby Jay, their special KU experience is one big secret. The students are told to tell as few people as possible their identity, leading to some awkward questions about their whereabouts on game days.

The identity of the students behind the masks are never publicly revealed. You can’t look them up on any website, and there’s no trace of their mascot exploits on social media.

But when Commencement comes, the graduating seniors get their one day to share with the world the activity that made them both a campus icon and completely nameless.

Laura Ballard, d’08, g’09, spent three of her four years at KU cheering for the Jayhawks from the sidelines as Baby Jay. As a sophomore, a graduating senior explained to her the tradition of wearing the boots for the walk down the hill.

“One of the first rules I learned as a mascot was to never be partially dressed in the suit – it ruins the ‘magic’ of the mascot,” Ballard said. “That’s when it hit me how truly special Commencement is. We spend our mascot career doing our best to perform anonymously, and graduation is the one time when we can be both Baby Jay and ourselves.”

“I overheard lots of people commenting on my shoes. A few thought it was a random way to stand out in the crowd, but I heard many exclaim, ‘She must be Baby Jay!’ I was really proud of all I had accomplished at KU as a student and a member of the Spirit Squad, so it felt good to be recognized. I was even asked to take a few pictures with random students, which actually felt very normal since I posed in many pictures with random people as a mascot.”

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The Walk: A Banner Day

Posted on May 12, 2018 in Alumni News and News

Briana McDougall carries the class of 2010 banner down the hill

The class banner tradition dates back to the first Commencement in 1873. Since then, students have lead their graduating class down the hill with banners designed by the Board of Class Officers. A collection of class banners is available for viewing in the Kansas Union.

For Board of Class Officers member Briana McDougall, ’11, Commencement led to “long discussions about what the banner should say” for the class motto, before settling on “Rooted in the Blue, Towering Toward the New.”

“We also got to take photos with the chancellor in her office before Commencement & sat on stage during the ceremony,” McDougall said. “It was a great honor to be able to represent the class & present our motto to the university.”

Jason Fried, c’14, served on the Board of Class Officers, and was chosen to carry the class banner down the hill. “Looking back, it was a great moment. It was definitely something that my parents and relatives were proud of.”

 

Jason Fried carries the class of 2014 banner

To learn more about Commencement, including the history of the ceremony, honorary degrees, and the special experience for Big and Baby Jays, read our full feature, The Walk.

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The Walk: The Highest Honor

Posted on May 12, 2018 in Alumni News and News

Speakers you likely won’t hear at a University of Kansas Commencement ceremony: Chance the Rapper, Oprah Winfrey, or Michael Bloomberg, all of whom have been tapped to speak at commencement events around the country this year.

KU’s Commencement ceremony traditionally features speeches from the university chancellor, the Kansas Board of Regents chair, and the KU Alumni Association chair, and an award presented to extraordinary leaders.

In 2012, under Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little, the university began awarding honorary degrees. The honor replaced distinguished citations after a petition to the Board of Regents.

The honorary degree is the highest honor bestowed by the university and is awarded to individuals of notable intellectual, scholarly, professional or creative achievement, or service to humanity.

The nomination process opens to members of the university community and the general public each year in March. The Chancellor’s Honorary Degree Committee then forwards several nominees to the chancellor for consideration. The following October, the Chancellor submits nominees to the Kansas Board of Regents for approval, and the recipients are honored at KU’s Commencement ceremony in May.
2012: The inaugural recipients of honorary degrees; Alan Mulally, e’68, g’69, president and CEO of Ford Motor Co. and keynote speaker; former FDIC chair Sheila Bair, c’75, l’78; former Senate Majority Leader Robert J. Dole, ’45; and renowned composer Kirke L. Mechem.

To learn more about Commencement, including the history of the walk down the hill, class banners, and the special experience for Big and Baby Jays, read our full feature, The Walk.

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Mayo Clinic researcher, KU alumnus to receive honorary degree

Posted on May 4, 2018 in Alumni News and News

Dr. Richard Weinshilboum, a KU alumnus, will receive an honorary degree during KU’s 146th Commencement ceremony on May 13.
A Mayo Clinic scientist who is a pioneer in the field of pharmacogenomics — the study of how drugs respond to a person’s genetics — will receive an honorary degree from the University of Kansas.

Dr. Richard Weinshilboum, a KU alumnus, will receive an honorary degree during KU’s 146th Commencement ceremony on May 13. He is the director of pharmacogenomics and chair of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology at the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, and he is also the Mayo Clinic’s Mary Lou and John H. Dasburg Professor of Cancer Genomics.

“Dr. Weinshilboum’s important and foundational work has opened the door to new advances that will help patients far into the future,” said Chancellor Douglas A. Girod. “His groundbreaking research in the field of genomics is helping to bring about a new era in medicine that enables doctors to customize treatments to fit their patients’ specific genetic makeups. We are honored to award him with an honorary degree during our Commencement ceremony this year.”

Girod recommended Weinshilboum for an honorary degree to the Kansas Board of Regents, which approved the chancellor’s recommendation.

Weinshilboum will receive the degree of Doctor of Science for his notable contributions in the field of pharmacogenomics. He earned a bachelor’s degree in zoology and chemistry and a medical degree from KU, concluding in 1967.

During a nearly 50-year career, Weinshilboum has helped to move his chosen field of study from theoretical to practical. Today, treatments can adjust to a patient’s genetics to increase efficacy or avoid life-threatening side effects, a practice known as “precision” or “individualized” medicine.

He has spent most of his career at the Mayo Clinic, where he has worked since 1972. He has earned continual support from the National Institutes of Health and has earned a number of honors from scientific societies, international organizations and universities.

KU awards honorary degrees based on nominees’ outstanding scholarship, research, creative activity, service to humanity or other achievements consistent with the academic endeavors of the university. Recipients do not need to be KU alumni, and philanthropic contributions to the university are not considered during the process.

Past honorary degree recipients include notable leaders such as Nobel Peace Prize winner and Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, Google Earth creator Brian McClendon, novelist Sara Paretsky, and Ford chief executive officer Alan Mulally.

Juan Manuel Santos, president of Colombia and 2016 recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, is also a 2018 honorary degree recipient. Santos visited campus in October to accept the honorary degree. Learn more about KU’s honorary degrees here. Information about 2018 Commencement events and activities can be found at the university’s Commencement website, www.commencement.ku.edu.

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Nearly 5,000 graduates walk down the Hill

Posted on May 16, 2017 in Alumni News and News

KU Commencement 2017 | Photo by Steve Puppe
The 145th Commencement of the University of Kansas took place Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Memorial Stadium.

Nearly 5,000 graduates made the traditional “walk down the Hill,” followed by a program and the conferral of degrees by Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little.

This year, an honorary degree was presented during Commencement to William McNulty, a U.S. Marine and Iraq War veteran who created Team Rubicon, a non-profit agency that recruits military veterans to provide disaster relief and humanitarian aid around the world. Read McNulty’s address to the graduating seniors.

Chancellor Gray-Little closed the ceremony with a farewell address to the graduating seniors. In that address, she urged the Class of 2017 to “run toward the chaos. Run toward the situations where you can make a difference. Use the knowledge and the sense of civic responsibility you’ve developed at KU to improve those situations, help people and make this world a better place.”

New graduates receive a one-year membership in the KU Alumni Association, compliments of KU Endowment and the Association, that runs through May 31, 2018. Graduates should update their mailing and email addresses with the University to ensure they receive information.

Students and parents can find more information about class rings, membership benefits, and alumni networks on our information page for new graduates.

Watch our slide show below to see pictures from Commencement, or view the photos on Flickr. Photos may be downloaded for personal use.
KU Commencement 2017

 

See additional Commencement photos on the University of Kansas Flickr page

 

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Jayhawks rally to give alumnus an unforgettable Commencement

Posted on May 12, 2017 in Alumni News and News

One of the most treasured traditions at the University of Kansas takes place every spring, when thousands of graduating students walk through the Campanile and down the Hill for Commencement.

Brian Palermo | www.kualumni.orgBrian Palermo, a KU Admissions representative based in St. Louis, never got to experience that moment. Shortly after graduating in December 2012, he accepted a job at a mental health facility for children in Oklahoma City. Knowing it would be difficult to take time off in May for the ceremony, he let the opportunity slip by.

Earlier this year, Palermo, c’13, shared with his supervisor, Elisa Zahn Krapcha, c’05, j’05, g’11, that he never participated in Commencement. She mentioned that the Admissions team should stage a small ceremony for him.

“I kind of knew we might do a little something, but I didn’t expect too much,” Palermo says.

Krapcha and Heidi Simon, g’00, senior associate director of Admissions, had a surprise in store. On May 8, they summoned nearly 20 team members to the Campanile, where Palermo was given a traditional cap and gown, as well as party beads and a crimson and blue lei.

Brian Palermo and Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little | www.kualumni.org“As I’m getting ready to walk through the Campanile, Heidi hands me a bottle of sparkling cider,” he recalls. “I got so focused on trying to open it, because people were shouting ‘Pop it, pop it!’ I was looking down at it and still walking when I heard someone say ‘Whoa, whoa! Hold on a moment.’”

When Palermo looked up, he saw Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little standing in front of him. “I was just floored,” he says. “I couldn’t believe she was there.”

The chancellor congratulated Palermo and delivered remarks, reminding him of KU’s noble mission: to lift students and society by educating leaders, building healthy communities and making discoveries that change the world.

“I challenged the graduates at the 2012 Commencement to continue to do all of these things after they walked down the Hill,” Gray-Little told him. “You’ve done these things even without being there to hear my call.”

As Palermo wraps up his first year as a KU Admissions representative, he’s more determined than ever to continue serving the University, thanks to the kindness and support of his team and Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little.

“It was just a really special moment that I don’t think I’ll ever forget,” he says.

—Heather Biele

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Call for Honorary Degree nominations for 2018

Posted on Mar 10, 2017 in Alumni News and News

KU Commencement 2012 | via @kualumni.org

The Chancellor’s Committee on Honorary Degrees invites you to propose exceptional individuals of notable intellectual, scholarly, professional or creative achievement, or service to humanity, to be awarded an honorary degree from the University of Kansas. An honorary degree recognizes an individual’s extraordinary contributions to the sciences, arts or humanities or other contributions to humanity.

Proposers should provide a brief supporting statement describing the person’s career and achievements, indicating why these contributions are exceptionally meritorious and detailing their relevance to the university’s academic endeavors.

No announcement will be made concerning individuals nominated, and all nominations will be treated as confidential information. The committee will review all nominations and may request further information that demonstrates that the nominee’s achievements and/or service are of such exceptional character as to merit the award of an honorary degree.

Individuals who have been previously nominated must be re-nominated to be considered for the May 2018 awards.

The committee will select candidates for honorary degrees and forward their names and supporting materials to the Chancellor for consideration. The Chancellor will then nominate to the Board of Regents for approval candidates for honorary degrees to be awarded at the 2018 Commencement.

Click here to nominate or re-nominate an outstanding individual for an honorary degree.

Nominations should be submitted electronically by April 7, 2017.

Questions may be addressed to:
Committee on Honorary Degrees
Chancellor’s Office, 230 Strong Hall
University of Kansas
Phone: 785-864-4186
kuchancellor@ku.edu

View the policy of the Board of Regents on Honorary Degrees.

Information about the nomination and selection of candidates for honorary degrees may be found at honorarydegrees.ku.edu.

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Nonprofit founder to receive 2017 honorary degree

Posted on Feb 17, 2017 in Alumni News and News

William McNulty in Haiti |  Photo courtesy of Team Rubicon

William McNulty, an Iraq War veteran and co-founder of Team Rubicon, will be awarded an honorary degree at KU’s 145th Commencement on May 14, 2017, in Memorial Stadium.

Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little recommended McNulty for an honorary degree to the Kansas Board of Regents. The board approved the chancellor’s recommendation during its meeting today, Jan. 18.

William McNultyMcNulty – himself a KU alumnus – created Team Rubicon to provide disaster relief and humanitarian aid to communities hit by natural disasters. The organization grew out of McNulty’s desire to continue serving his country when his enlistment in the United States Marine Corps ended. After organizing a team of veterans to help with disaster response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake, McNulty recognized that military veterans’ unique skills offered a model for a disaster-response organization that would bridge the gap between the immediate aftermath of disasters and the arrival of large-scale relief efforts from governments and aid organizations.

“William McNulty has turned his experience in war-torn areas of the world into a global effort to aid similar communities, while at the same time easing the transition of military veterans to civilian life by offering a sense of community, identity and purpose,” Chancellor Gray-Little said. “His innovative and meaningful work is making our world a better place, and for that, he is an inspiration to the entire KU community. We look forward to awarding him his honorary degree in May 2017.”

Team Rubicon was featured on the cover of Kansas Alumni magazine, issue 2, 2016. Read the full article here.

McNulty will be awarded the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters for outstanding contributions to global humanitarian and relief efforts.

McNulty earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Kansas and his master’s degree from Johns Hopkins University.

Read the full press release from the University of Kansas here.

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